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Author page: Eric Caudill

Often times the best way to learn something new is to follow those who have gone before you.  So Greek To Me reached out to a group of students who have completed the online course. We asked them for tips and advice for students just beginning their Biblical Greek learning journey!Here are their words of wisdom:
  • Keep thinking and using of Greek in everyday life. Specifically, using the Greek word instead of English words, (i.e., hands, mouth, door, water, eye, speak and many other verbs as well, etc.
 
  • Have a schedule. My schedule went something like this: Sunday - start looking at the words for next week. Monday - listen to the lessons online. Tuesday - do the online practice. Wednesday - do the practice sentences. Thursday - start the translation. Friday - finish the translation, correct, and submit. Saturday - review the chapter and practice questions in the book and take the quiz.
 
  • Manage your time well. Greek is a time intensive study if you want to succeed. (Spend time on your vocab! There is no excuse for getting your vocab words wrong and they are a big part of quizzes and tests grades so invest in the mobile app and have at it.)
 
  • If I had it to do over?  I advise any and all new Greek students to study and memorize the vocabulary before they are required. Catching up was a bear to say the least.I would also suggest that students hear and repeat aloud all their vocabulary as they write it in order that they may recognize and tie the sound and sight of the words together.
 
  • Learn your endings and the definite article. (If you do not take the time to learn about ART ICICLE, YOU WILL HAVE REAL DIFFICULTY)
 
  • Work through your Greektome website materials each week and practice vocab every day. It helped me to work on the assignment over several days each week and also helped to go back and read your comments on my assignment before taking the weekly quiz. Along with your helpful mnemonics I made up some of my own rhymes and analogies help me remember some of the vocab. Something I learned the hard way is to not slack in reviewing material over breaks.
 
  • Read the Greek even if you don't know most of the words. I started early; trying to spot verb endings and getting used to recognizing vocabulary words in different forms other than the lexical form. I also began to pick up new words that I would later see as vocabulary words.
 
  • Set aside adequate time each week for study.  DON'T get behind.
 
  • Writing out the words in Greek helps memorization while pronouncing the words out loud.
 We hope you these nuggets of wisdom help prepare you and guide you through your learning journey. Soon enough you'll be the graduate giving advice to future students!-The Greek To Me Team
Learning Biblical Greek - Tips & Advice

Learning Biblical Greek – Tips & Advice

Often times the best way to learn something new is to follow those who have gone before you.  So Greek To Me reached out to a group of students who have completed the online course. We asked them for tips and advice for students just beginning their Biblical Greek learning journey! Here are their words of wisdom: (more…)
Textural Variations in our Modern New Testament - Part 2

Textural Variations in our Modern New Testament – Part 2

Here is part 2 or 2 on the textural variances series. This one covers "intentional" changes. If you missed part 1 make sure you head on over and watch that one first!  (more…)
Are There Textural Variations in our Modern New Testament?

Are There Textural Variations in our Modern New Testament?

The modern day New Testament is built on over 5500+ manuscripts. Is it not possible some variations occurred during the copying/translating/re-copying of these 5500+ manuscripts?? Greek To Me creator Dr. J. Lyle Story helps answer this question in a 2 part VLOG series. (more…)
Pope Calls For Lord's Prayer Phrase Change

Pope Calls For Lord’s Prayer Phrase Change

As you may have heard a few days ago Pope Francis called for a phrase change to The Lord's Prayer. The change is related to the phrase about "leading us into temptation". Naturally, Greek To Me was intrigued by the Pope's call to shake things up in regards to the English Translation of the Greek text. (more…)
New Testament Source Documents - Part V

New Testament Source Documents – Part V

Dr. J. Lyle Story brings you the conclusion of the 5 part series about the history and original document sources of the New Testament. This video brings it all together to really reminds us all of the amazing story behind the history of the New Testament documents. Take it away Lyle! (more…)
New Testament Source Documents - Part IV

New Testament Source Documents – Part IV

Dr. J. Lyle Story continues his five part video series about the history and original document sources of the New Testament. This video explores the 2,135 "lectionaries" source documents which were used as liturgical readings following the Christian calendar. Enjoy! (more…)
New Testament Source Documents - Part III

New Testament Source Documents – Part III

Dr. J. Lyle Story continues his five part video series about the history and original document sources of the New Testament. This video explores the 2,533 "minuscules" source documents covering the 9th century and forward. Enjoy! (more…)
New Testament Source Documents - Part II

New Testament Source Documents – Part II

Dr. J. Lyle Story continues his five part video series about the history and original document sources of the New Testament. This video explores the 242 "parchment" source documents covering the 3rd to 13th century. (more…)
New Testament Source Documents - Part I

New Testament Source Documents – Part I

Dr. J. Lyle Story begins his five part video series about the history and original document sources of the New Testament. At Greek To Me we feel it is important for us to realize something about the process by which we have our Greek New Testament.  (more…)
Greek NT Scribe - Job Description

Greek NT Scribe – Job Description

In our day, when we want to make a copy of a document, it’s relatively easy. We go to our printer, turn it on, and with a touch of buttons, we can make all kinds of selections (color, pagination, reducing, enlarging, stapling, binding, etc.). We do it without thinking too hard. And provided our printer is working properly, the printer will give us just what we selected. It’s so easy for us to forget the great difficulties that belonged to the copying of early Greek manuscripts by hand. Printing presses certainly came much later. Here is a job description for a scribe: (more…)